FLUIDATA @ QUT this June – works by EXIST colleagues Igneous artists James Cunningham and Suzon Fuks

May 30, 2015 Leave a comment

Fluid data

FLUIDATA is an immersive experiential installation with durational performances by Igneous, a Brisbane-based inter-media and performance company. The work explores questions around the state of Queensland creeks, the ways in which digital media can help connect audiences with the natural environment and anecdotes about local waterways.

For the development of this interactive installation, Igneous artists James Cunningham and Suzon Fuks drove 7,000 km, crossed 663 waterways and slowly, quietly walked down two dozen creeks throughout Queensland recording imagery, sound and data files.

OPENING 13 June at 6pm, with performance at 7pm, live streamed here: http://water-wheel.net/taps/view/794.
For performance time in your timezone, look here: http://bit.ly/1Rc4IW0
MORE INFO: http://bit.ly/dapfluidata

exist@Metro 2014 Eleanor Jackson ‘Social Climbing’ – Press Release

May 11, 2015 Leave a comment

As a part of Metro Arts’ new Friday Night event series, exist is excited to be programming a series of works in progress from contemporary live artists.

SOCIAL CLIMBING is a new work in progress by Eleanor Jackson, programmed as a part of exist@Metro Arts. Tactile and tender, SOCIAL CLIMBING explores the quality of demonstrative closeness. Situated in the Metro Arts stairwell, SOCIAL CLIMBING begins with the simple act of holding hands and walking upstairs.

Eleanor Jackson is a queer, Filipina-Australian whose narrative-based work engages with

love and loss relayed in intimate performance settings. Following on from previous experiences in smaller, closed settings at Metro Arts, ‘A Timely Act of Intimacy’ and ‘Now You See Me’, SOCIAL CLIMBING experiments with intimacy in the public realm.

Eleanor is presenting a development of a performance piece for EXIST-ENCE 6 International Festival of Live Art, Performance Art and Action Art.

Metro Arts Friday Nights showcase work in development; rough, ready, and full of potential. Step into studios and rehearsals – see the unseen; give feedback on new ideas; have a glass of wine with Brisbane’s premier artists.

Image: Eleanor Jackson 2015.

 

EVENT DETAILS

Venue:                                    

Metro Arts, 109 Edward St, Brisbane

Opening Event:                       Friday 5 June 2015. Program 6pm

Tickets:                                   Tickets are Free Free Free!

Further information:                www.existenceperformanceart.wordpress.com

exist@Metro 2014 Program now available

January 8, 2015 3 comments

Documentation: exist@Metro Dec 5 Max Fowler-Roy, Samantha Axiak, Dr Peter Blamey

December 18, 2014 Leave a comment
Dr. Peter Blamey playing light sensors with solar panels in Max Fowler-Roy and Samantha Axiak 'Toilet Roll Doll - Untitled'

Dr. Peter Blamey playing light sensors with solar panels in Max Fowler-Roy and Samantha Axiak ‘Toilet Roll Doll – Untitled’

Timothy Green playing recycled 50L water bottle in Max Fowler-Roy and Samantha Axiak 'Toilet Roll Doll - Untitled'

Timothy Green playing recycled 50L water bottle in Max Fowler-Roy and Samantha Axiak ‘Toilet Roll Doll – Untitled’

Samantha Axiak playing modified smoke alarm in Max Fowler-Roy and Samantha Axiak's 'Toilet Roll Doll - Untitled'

Samantha Axiak playing modified smoke alarm in Max Fowler-Roy and Samantha Axiak’s ‘Toilet Roll Doll – Untitled’

This is the second site-specific improvisation for Max Fowler-Roy’s extended percussion collaborative experiment. The first being a bathroom at Real Bad Music, where a selection from the 7 hours + of recordings has been published onto a tape released by Brisbane boutique cassette label, Breakdance the Dawn. Instruments include found percussion as well as modified and recycled industrial waste. Max says,

“I have been considering the role of a space on sound and the way it propagates in the parameters of different structures. …I thought it would be fun to try a more communal, inclusive approach to this by sounding a space in the company of a number of different people each allowing them to input sound in the structure as they journey through the stairwell, then see how their input responds to the space and our sounds.”

Max Fowler-Roy studies double bass at the Queensland Conservatorium of Music. Samantha Axiak studies Visual Arts at Southbank TAFE.

from Kieran (Programming Manger at Metro Arts):

Capping off a year-long series of one-night co-presentations, Metro Arts welcomes EXIST back into the building as they curate a night of experimental music into the unique acoustics of our central stairwell. Dr Peter Blamey, fresh from working at the National Gallery of Victoria’s acclaimed Instrument Builder Project, joins artists Max Fowler-Roy and Samantha Axiak in a percussive improvisation working with handmade instruments and extending on their practice of site-specific work.

Instruments include a solar panels and light sensors, smoke alarm, several 50L water bottle, wailer, cocktail shaker, hand cranked fire siren, cat bells, recorder.

exist@metro December 2014 Max Fowler-Roy ‘Toilet Roll Doll – Untitled’ from EXIST ARI on Vimeo.

Documentation: EXIST@METRO Friday Nights November – Bonnie Hart ‘HR’

December 1, 2014 Leave a comment

Bonnie Hart HR for EXIST 2Bonnie Hart HR for EXISTBonnie Hart 'HR' 3 for exist

Bonnie Hart will be presenting a durational performance and cinema installation in ‘HR’

The familiar whir of film projectors set the sound stage for this industrial manifesto on the economic value of labour. For 3 hours, Bonnie’s body will be harvesting sweat, her body wrapped in plastic, whilst projectors in the corners of the room are triggered with motion sensors by the audience.

Bonnie’s practice is an assemblage of filmmaking, music, performance art, visual art and sculptural installation.  She holds a degree in film production from QUT, her work being screened internationally both on television and at festivals including the NowNow (Aus), Exploding Cinema/Collision Festival (UK), Raindance (UK) and Brisbane & Melbourne International Film Festival (Aus). In 2006 Bonnie founded the audio visual laboratory Venting Gallery which produced the Rituals of the Captured Moment series of 1000 films about experimental music. She is the founding Secretary of the Foundation for Contemporary Music & Culture and President of the Androgen Insensitivity Syndrome Support Group Australia. Her current solo project is a fusion of performance stagecraft, the textural beauty of handmade celluloid and a tragicomedy of continually malfunctioning systems/equipment – loosely termed ‘expanded cinema

Contextualising: Max Fowler Roy ‘Toilet Roll Doll’

November 10, 2014 1 comment

exist@Metro Arts
Friday Nights: December
Dec 5, 2014

Max Fowler-Roy will be presenting a performance, ‘Toilet Roll Doll – Untitled 2’

This is the second site-specific improvisation for Max Fowler-Roy’s extended percussion group. The first being a bathroom at Real Bad Music, where a selection from the 7 hours + of recordings has been published onto a tape released by Brisbane boutique cassette label, Breakdance the Dawn. Instruments include found percussion as well as hand made bass instruments from recycled industrial waste.

in 2014, Max as part of EXIST-ENCE 5’s DAIS program for emerging artists, staged a site-specific free improvisation in the pedestrian tunnel under Vulture St, Sth Brisbane (near South Bank station).

EXIST-ENCE 5 international festival live art performance art action art – Max Fowler-Roy from EXIST ARI on Vimeo.

I thought of Max’s work when I went to NOWNOW festival 2014 and saw a site-specific performance in a drain. The response to site and sound are different, in regards to Brisbane’s collective and evolving music opposed to Sydney’s repetitive minimal (although durational) performance.

In juxtaposition, Sydney also has a tradition of site-specific improvisation in natural environments, this movement led primarily by Jim Denley (saxophone).

It seems like Brisbane’s less developed art music industry has led towards exploratory music being more of a collective experience as the boundaries between audience and artist is blurred. The heirarchy of ‘virtuouso musician’ and ‘audience’ is definitely subverted in our loose, informal environment without the need for instruction or ‘non-playing stunts,’ This is what Max has to say about the performance in the uniquely acoustic Metro Art’s stairwell this Friday night..

“I have been considering the role of a space on sound and the way it propagates in the parameters of different structures. …I thought it would be fun to try a more communal, inclusive approach to this by sounding a space in the company of a number of different people each allowing them to input sound in the structure as they journey through the stairwell, then see how their input responds to the space and our sounds.”

EXIST@METRO: July 2014 Documentation Alrey Batol

July 14, 2014 1 comment

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Documentation Photo by Alan Warren. Video by Nicola.

exist@metro: Friday Night July 2014 Alrey Batol from EXIST ARI on Vimeo.

Alrey Batol will be presenting an interactive installation, Touch Machine.

Touch Machine questions the value of touch and the physical body in our own art community, how ready are we to touch and what do we expect will happen? These questions are framed in Batol’s signature use of hacking technology. In this case, it is a hacked radio, which provides the sonic response to how two people approach (ie. testing the sensitivity and frequency of) touching each other. ‘Touch Machine’ shows how Batol’s live art process has developed since his last work in progress, ‘Waterbirds’ was shown at Metro Arts’ Friday Night: May 2013. Inspired by the live art and ready-to-interact audience that fill Metro Art’s Friday Night, Touch Machine further tests the viewers’ interactivity with machines and each other.

EXIST@METRO Friday Night July 2014 Leif Gifford

July 13, 2014 Leave a comment

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exist@metro July 2014 Leif Gifford ‘Contained Explosions’ from EXIST ARI on Vimeo.

Documentation Photographs by Alan Warren. Video by Nicola.

Leif Gifford will be presenting a live performance, Contained Explosions.

Contained Explosions is the next stage of development in Gifford’s ‘Explosive Tendencies’ series of audio-visual experiments. Her performance for Friday Night, incorporates previous sculptural works with her new videomapping processes. Within the immersiv installation, she animates, destroys and rebuilds her memories with cues from live music and projections. Enter Leif’s collapsing and renewing world of sculpture, projection and exploding memories. She invites us into a scribbly, colourful, volatile world inside all of our heads, whilst technically testing the boundaries of videomapping and textile sculpture.

Contextualising: Leif Gifford’s ‘Contained Explosions’

July 1, 2014 1 comment

Leif Gifford for her exist@Metro performance uses a technique called video mapping.

This is a relatively new technique in live video art where projections are mapped to architectural or sculptural structures. Adding audio to the video mapping experience can make the performance like contemporary theatre or being in a live music video. Gifford’s abstractions are well-developed and use drawing as a base, rather than graphic design which is commonly used commercially. As the video mapping software develops so does the artform.

Australia’s own CSIRO has developed a 3-D mapping tool, the Zebedee

What could you imagine Gifford or yourself doing if you could get access to this?
#Arts/Science Residencies #ANAT

Here are some links from VICE’s Creator’s project, where the video mapping process was used similary to ‘Contained Explosions’ on cardboard boxes.

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http://thecreatorsproject.vice.com/blog/hundreds-of-cardboard-boxes-gatecrash-an-arts-center-for-an-experimental-video-installation

What do you think of Leif’s work? Let us know and join the live chat #EXISTari

Contextualising: Alrey Batol’s ‘Touch Machine’

July 1, 2014 Leave a comment

Did you catch GOMA’s feature exhibition on performance art?? ‘Trace: Performance and its Documents.” Does this video jog your memory?


Within Trace there was a piece that uses a similar electrical process, as Batol’s ‘Touch Machine.’
It is Joyce Hinterding’s “Large ULAM VLF Loop.”
Essentially in Hinterding’s work your body is completing an extra extra low volatge circuit between the alligator clip and the graphite on the wall, and in Batol’s work your body is completing an extra extra low voltage circuit with somebody else’s body as each of you you hold onto a knob. Technically, you could use two bodies in Hinterding’s work also, but it is set up for solo interaction with just one set of headphones.

Artist: Joyce Hinterding
Title: Large Ulam VLF loop (graphite) 2011

Review on Hinterding’s work here

“Pop on the headphones and then touch the graphite pattern that is painted on the wall.  As a naturally very curious person I found this intriguing, and I find that point where science and art meet fascinating.  I spent at least 8 minutes touching different parts of the pattern, to see how the sound coming through the headphones was affected.

I had a very interesting sensation immediately after taking off the cans. The buzzing continued in my ears for a few minutes, which was very disorienting in the quiet environment of the gallery.  While I had been immersed in the artwork with the headphones on, as soon as they came off and I looked away, it was as if I’d just woken from a deep sleep, with earplugs in and I still couldn’t hear anything.

I enjoyed this artwork as it is not often that I am invited to interact with a piece, and while the sounds were not pleasant to listen to, it was interesting to hear the changes according to where I placed my hands, and sometimes face.”

PERIL magazine’s Eleanor Jackson had this to say about Batol’s work Read more here

“Batol, a multi-disciplinary artist with intersecting interests across the mediums of intervention, new media and sculpture, will be presenting the interactive installation, Touch Machine. Drawing upon some of Batol’s signature approaches to exploiting technology for unpredicted ends, the work features hacked technologies that provide sonic response to incidents of human touch.

The tactile and the technological provide delicious contrast and congruence for modern-day audiences. On one hand, video games, mobile devices and personal computers all employ haptic feedback in increasingly ubiquitous and normalized ways. On the other hand, human touching and feeling, and the accompanying social interactivity implied in physical touch – particularly between strangers – seems to present something more dangerous and unexpected. Our phones may be on vibrate for each other, but when it comes down to it, Batol asks “how ready are we to touch and what do we expect will happen?”

What do you think about Alrey Batol’s work?
Comment on your blog and leave a link #EXISTari  PRETTY PRETTY PLEASE